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Experts in: Colonization and decolonization

Meren, David

MEREN, David

Professeur agrégé

I have taught the international history of Canada and Quebec at Université de Montréal since 2011. My goal as a historian is to use cultural and social history, as well as postcolonial studies, to obtain and promote a greater understanding of the history of Canada and Quebec in the world, and the way in which their international activities (governmental and non-governmental) have shaped and been shaped by the lived experiences of the peoples living in the northern portion of North America. I employ international history to explore Canada and Quebec as projects of rule, while situating them and their populations in global currents.

My first book, With Friends Like These: Entangled Nationalisms and the Canada-Québec-France Triangle, 1944-1970, examines the complex triangular dynamic between Canada, Quebec and France by situating this in the broader currents of the history of globalization. It explores the concept of “nation” in an increasingly interconnected world, and parallel to this, the efforts to manage multiple overlapping identities. This monograph also is part of my ongoing effort to shed light on the question of “empire” in Canadian and Quebec history.

More recently, these research interests led to my co-editing a volume that offers and encourages a reinterpretation of Canadian international history through the prism of race Dominion of Race: Rethinking Canada’s International History. I also explore the history of settler colonialism in Canada and Quebec, as it is impossible to understand Canadian and Quebec international history without referring to the complex history of the relationships between Indigenous peoples and settlers. This idea also underpins my current research project, exploring the entangled history of Canadian development assistance after 1945 and Indigenous-Canadian relations.

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Milton, Cynthia E.

MILTON, Cynthia E.

Professeure titulaire

Analyzing, both traditional and new methods of resolving conflicts by "saying the truth", she studies the Peruvian regions strongly affected by the Shining Path. Her present research centers on the works of Art produced following a period of violence. She presently holds an Alexander Von Humboldt Research Fellowship (2011-2014) for experienced researchers. She is the Director of the Chair in Contemporary Mexican Studies (CEMC) and the Research Network on Latin America (RÉAL).

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MONNAIS, Laurence

Professeure titulaire, Directrice

I am a medical historian and specialize in Southeast Asia. I have been working for over 15 years on the development of health policy and practices from the 19th century to the present, with a particular focus in recent years on the multiple "encounters" between Western (biomedicine) and so-called alternative and traditional forms of medicine. I am a determined advocate of a multidisciplinary, transnational approach, and recently developed projects and published on medications as a social object, immigrants' health practices and the identity of Vietnamese medicine.

I have held the Canada Research Chair in Healthcare Pluralism since 2007, and I work to improve our understanding of changes in health indicators in modern societies, over-medication and rejection of vaccination, as well as the enthusiasm for alternative medicine - all behaviours that are giving rise to increasing concern but also to different interpretations, which deserve to be revisited and examined from a historical perspective.

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Perreault, Jacques Y.

PERREAULT, Jacques Y.

Directeur, Professeur titulaire

My interests concern Greek colonization, colonial urbanization and the relations between Greeks and barbarians. In an attempt to respond to the questions raised by these issues, I am directing two archaeological missions. The first, in Syria, is located in the large Ras al-Bassit bay. This is the ancient Posideion of the Greeks, one of the oldest contact sites from the 1st millennium BC between Greeks and peoples on the Syro-Palestinian coast. The research conducted on this site has given us a better understanding of how contacts developed between Greeks and Orientals and the origins of one of the key periods in art and architecture of ancient Greece, the Orientalizing period.

The second dig site is Argilos, in northern Greece, a region that the Greeks colonized starting in the 8thcentury BC. This was the first Greek colony in the Lower Strymon region, a settlement founded by colonists from the Cycladic island of Andros. Argilos enjoyed tremendous prosperity in the 6th and 5thcenturies BC, and the digs have turned up a number of surprisingly well-preserved buildings, allowing us to study the urban development of a colonial city, the evolution of homes, and contacts and trade with indigenous peoples.

In Montreal, in the Mediterranean Archaeology Laboratory, students and research assistants work on databases relating to these projects and help in the stylistic and chronological analysis of the excavated archaeological materials.

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Saul, Samir

SAUL, Samir

Professeur titulaire

I publish, teach and supervise students at the Master's, PhD and post-doctorate levels in the field (or theme) of the history of international relations. I am interested primarily in France and the Arab world. I am a student and proponent of the "French School" of the history of international relations (HIR), which updated the study of the international phenomenon by including and integrating "deep forces" (economic, social, institutional, cultural, etc.) in the analysis. This approach generated a rich historiography whose originality transformed and reinvigorated the field of international history. This vitality is just as valuable today as it was yesterday in terms of questioning, investigating and discovering, as illustrated by the number of students doing their MA and PhD studies in HIR.

The issue that has intrigued me the most is the connections between the political and economic dimensions internationally. This question underpins many of my publications, in particular my work on Franco-Egyptian relations based on a doctorat d'État (I am among the last to have obtained this venerable diploma under the French university system, as it has now been replaced by the single dissertation). It led to a monograph, currently in printing, on the decolonization of French North Africa. In economic history, my interests focus on movements of capital, international trade and the history of businesses (banks, oil companies, electricity companies).

Since 2004 I have been a founding member and co-ordinator of the Groupement interuniversitaire pour l'histoire des relations internationales (GIHRIC). Along with research, I find teaching a real pleasure, as shown by the Award of Outstanding Achievement in Teaching I received early in my career from the Faculty of Arts and Science. The flame still burns brightly!

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Wien, Thomas

WIEN, Thomas

Professeur agrégé

My research concerns all aspects of the history of New France, and its European ramifications. I am interested in the circulation of people, goods, knowledge and information between Native and French America and Europe (1660-1800). I am continuing my work on North American fur trade routes, in a hemispheric space extending from Native American lands eastward all the way to Asia.

A project on the circulation of knowledge considers natural history as a means of appropriation, for the moment through the work of Jean-François Gaultier (1708-1756), the King's physician in Quebec City and correspondent for the Académie royale des sciences.

I am also exploring the field of historiography and popular memory, and in particular the fate of the French Regime in Canada after the Conquest of 1759.

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